Tagged as West Virginia

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Hundreds of Kroger Associates Win $90,000 Settlement in West Virginia

Pictured left to right, back row first: David Simpson, Gary Southall, Shawn Cantrell, Chelsea Snow, Stephen Bumgardner and Randy Fields at Kroger #725 in St. Albans, W.Va.

Hundreds of Local 400 members are about to receive back pay checks after winning a $90,000 settlement against Kroger, following a grievance against the company over lengthy delays in implementing raises provided for under the terms of their contract.

Kroger members in West Virginia ratified a new contract last Fall that provided raises for backups and night crew workers. The contract was ratified on November 6, but the raises were supposed to take effect retroactively to October 7, 2017—the date the previous contract expired. But Kroger didn’t start paying the new raises until February 2018, leaving a roughly four-month gap when hundreds of people should have been paid at the higher rate.

“When we went to a meeting on the contract, I saw that DSD [direct store delivery] people got their raises immediately and someone in pharmacy got a raise in December, but they made us wait until February,” recalled David Simpson, a 38-year Kroger veteran who is shop steward and backup meat cutter at Kroger #725 in St. Albans, W.Va.

“That wasn’t right,” he said. “So I looked into it. I talked to the night crew and meat cutters and they thought they should be getting their raises too.”

David filed a grievance against Kroger and with the assistance of his Local 400 representative, Gary Southall, worded it to ensure that it covered all 522 members affected by the company’s contract violation.

The grievance went through first, second, and third level meetings and each time, Kroger refused to budge. It was finally slated for arbitration and at that point, the company realized it was unlikely to win and negotiated the $90,000 settlement.

“I was very excited about the victory,” Dave said. “A little extra never hurts anybody. I thought I was right all along and this shows Kroger knew it. I told the night crew and everyone was happy.

“Kroger’s always trying to put one over on us and this time we got them instead,” he added.

The $90,000 settlement is being divided equally among the 522 members who were affected. Settlement checks have been mailed and should arrive in members’ mailboxes over the next several days.

West Virginia Shop Steward Hosts His Own Union Meetings at Home

Jim Logan holds a sign at a Kroger rally in West Virginia.

Jim Logan has been a Kroger employee and union member in West Virginia for 42 years. He lives in Caldwell and works in Fairlea, but to people who don’t live there, it’s all Lewisburg – the town with a population of around 3,800 that was named “the coolest small town in America” by Budget Travel in 2011. While Lewisburg may be celebrated for its “breathtaking vistas,” and “eclectic food scene,” the area around it is often overlooked.

“It’s considered a good retirement place, good hunting, good fishing,” Jim says. “You have a wide gamut of people, [you have people] who live at the sporting club at Greenbrier, which is beyond our imagination, and then you have people who are just squeaking by.”

Jim’s coworkers know this better than anyone. “Everyone knows how tight things have gotten in the last ten years,” he says. “And it used to be that it didn’t affect everybody, but no one has any sense of security nowadays.”

But he sees in this economic hardship an opportunity for building solidarity. “Everyone needs to feed a family, and they may differ on certain viewpoints, but beyond that everyone agrees that a livable wage is an important thing, insurance is an important thing,” he says. “We need to focus on those issues and then respect everyone else’s position on different issues, and be willing to allow a diversity of people to come to the table. […] And that’s what the union does in the workplace — it allows people to have a voice in their future. And that’s a precious thing.”

Jim served as a member of the Contract Action Team during negotiations with Kroger last year. “I had really hoped to be at the table negotiating, but instead they put me on the action committee, and I was like, this is not what I want to do,” he admits. “But then I thought, well, if I’m going to be a positive impact, I can’t back down now, I have to do this.”

And he learned a lot in the process, about organizing informational picket lines, connecting with other unions and members from elsewhere, and communicating with customers about workers’ needs.

When the local started organizing demonstrations at Kroger stores throughout West Virginia, Jim and his coworkers were invited to participate at the protest in Beckley, about an hour away. They certainly had cause to demonstrate – turnover was high and only getting higher and many of Jim’s coworkers, especially the younger and newer employees, felt undervalued and disrespected by the company.

Now more than ever, they needed to know that their union was fighting for them and that they could and should participate in that fight. “We just really needed to say, enough is enough,” he says, and they needed to say it in Fairlea.

So they held their own demonstration. “We had a good turnout,” he recalls. “People were coming out on their lunches and breaks and joining in, and it was really well received in the community. [Customers] would literally come up and say, ‘Do you want us not to go in and shop?’ And we would say, ‘No, we just want you to understand what’s going on and what we’re trying to accomplish.”

With mounting public pressure on Kroger, an agreement was reached and a new contract was ratified a few weeks later with zero cuts. This certainly was a victory, but Jim knows there is always more work to be done. And since West Virginia became a right-to-work state in 2016, he’s learning to play a whole new ball game.

“There’s no way someone can just start at a job and grasp all of the dynamics that are involved in having a decent job,” he says. “So [with right-to-work] there’s this huge educational curve, right from the get-go, of what it means to belong to the union and what it can accomplish. And what I’m learning is that in that little 15 minute introduction, without any kind of established relationship with a new person it’s almost an impossible thing to accomplish.”

As an ordained Baptist minister, Jim used to formally pastor a church, but since he’s lived in Caldwell, West Virginia he’s been “unchurching,” or holding services in people’s houses. On Tuesday nights he hosts bible study in his own home, and every once in a while, he hosts a union meeting. Otherwise, Jim and his co-workers have to drive an hour to get to union meetings, which he says can be economically burdensome.

He usually only hosts union meetings at his house for special occasions, but he’s been thinking about hosting more casual get-togethers, “bridge-builders” he calls them, to help create a stronger sense of community in his store.

“It’s probably the direction we need to go,” he says. “Now in an environment of right-to-work, you’ve got those issues of trust and truth again. You can say you care but sometimes you have to show you care.”

With 42 years of experience under his belt, Jim Logan sounds patient, almost calm, but part of what allows him to connect with younger workers is that he remembers how frustrating it was to be in their position.

He has a saying: “A bunch of straws are harder to break than just one.” He knows that all of his co-workers complaints are valid, no matter how long they’ve been working for Kroger, but he also knows that the best way to address them is to stand together.

“I try to articulate it’s a long-term investment,” Jim says about union dues. “And when [new employees] look in that contract they can see some of those better wages, [and realize] that it took everyone a long time to get there but the only way to get there is to stick together.”

Both his patience and his passion are manifestations of how much Jim Logan cares. He says he doesn’t know why he became a shop steward. But then he says, with absolute certainty, “I really care about people. And I’ve got this thing, if someone is an underdog or at a disadvantage, if someone takes advantage of that, that just really lights me up. It’s something in my nature.”

And it’s not changing any time soon. As he looks forward, Jim has a bunch of ideas for how he can better support his fellow union members and build community relationships, both in his corner of West Virginia and throughout the region. He hopes to retire from Kroger soon, but not from union activism.

“If and when I get to retire, I think that then I will become more and more politically active, because the union needs friends,” he says. “And I will do it without compromising, because I’m not doing it for a career or economics, just because it’s the right thing to do.”

Montgomery General Workers Prevent Major Cuts With New Union Contract

Local 400 members working at the Montgomery General Elderly Care Center in Montgomery, W.Va. recently ratified a strong new union contract after months of difficult, rancorous negotiations.

At the start of negotiations, management presented a list of 34 takeaway proposals.  These included eliminating the workers’ pension, reducing health benefits, cutting vacation time and taking away two holidays.

Needless to say, the workers were having none of it.

“I’ve worked for this company for 30 years and this was the third bargaining I’ve been involved with,” said Pam Barron, a Local 400 shop steward who works in housekeeping/environmental services. “This was by far the toughest set of negotiations, but in the end, we turned it around.”

The workers stood strong in solidarity in opposing Montgomery General’s extreme demands. On Fridays, they are allowed to wear t-shirts to work, so every Friday during bargaining, they wore their Local 400 t-shirts, hats and buttons. They also wore their Local 400 t-shirts to the company picnic.

“Everyone was wonderful and once the company saw we were strong, that helped out,” Pam said. “If we hadn’t gotten a deal, we were ready to strike, too. Cynthia Davis, our other shop steward, was terrific, keeping us all together, fired up and ready to act.

“I think the company also finally realized how hard we work and how dedicated we are,” Pam added. “That’s what led to our contract.”

The final agreement provides for a three percent raise, and it maintained the workers’ pension, holidays and vacations.

“This is a good company and they’ve been good to me,” Pam said. “I just thank God we got through this and hopefully, we won’t have to again. I’m also thankful for our union, which was wonderful every step of the way.”

Dr. Pepper Workers Win Major Wage Increases in New Union Contract

Local 400 members working at the Dr. Pepper plants in Fairmont, West Virginia, and Belpre, Ohio, recently ratified a new union contract that includes the largest wage increases since the facility was organized.

Warehouse workers will receive as much as $3.50/hour more over the four year term of the contract, while drivers and others who are paid by the case or by the mile will also receive large pay hikes. All workers will have a slight reduction in out-of-pocket costs for health insurance in 2019 and the employer has agreed to a 100% match into the 401(k) plan.

“We gained on everything,” said Rod Plauger, a bulk delivery driver and shop steward who organized the plant approximately 20 years ago and served on the bargaining committee. “This gave us more than we ever have.  We got everything we asked for.

“This round of bargaining was a lot calmer than the way things used to go,” he said. “In the past, the company would never give us a penny. The company was doing a changeover with new ownership and that might have played a part.”

Still, the road to a contract was not smooth. In fact, the members rejected the company’s first contract offer.

“Our members are strong-willed,” Rod said. “It was surprising to a lot of people that the first offer was rejected. We were prepared for anything, even a strike. But when we went back to the company, they moved some money around until everybody was satisfied.

“I was very impressed with the way negotiations were handled on our side, and the result speaks for itself,” he added.

Aug 18: “Labor Day” at Appalachian Power Park

Night game at Appalachian Power Park vs. Lexington Legends, June 12, 2010. Photo by ChristopherLocke.

Free Game Tickets for Union Members & Their Families!

Join us for “Labor Day” at Appalachian Power Park on Saturday, August 18. Free game tickets are available for union members and their families (four tickets per family).

2:00 p.m. Tailgate
Charleston Building & Construction Trades
600 Leon Sullivan Way, Charleston, WV 25301

5:00 p.m. Gates Open

6:00 p.m. Game Time

To get your free tickets, contact:

Paul Breedlove, Charleston Building Trades, 304-542-6952
Kris Mallory, Reconnecting McDowell, 800-222-9838
Dena Fields, West Virginia AFL-CIO, 304-344-3557

Presented By:

Charleston Building & Construction Trades Council
West Virginia State Building & Construction Trades
West Virginia AFL-CIO
AFT-West Virginia
USW #12625
AFT – Putnam
Kanawha Valley Labor Council
UMWA International
WV CWA#2001
Reconnecting McDowell
UMWA #2286

May 8: Cast Your Vote in West Virginia Primary Election

On Tuesday, May 8, 2018, West Virginians will vote in an important statewide primary election. We must vote to change our current legislative leadership’s war on working families which has stifled workers’ voices, lowered wages, and made workplaces less safe.

It is vital that you vote in the election Tuesday, May 8, 2018. Your vote is a personal decision. As your union, it is our job to recommend candidates who share our values and will fight to make a better life for our union family. We have endorsed the following candidates for office because we believe they will fight to turn around the anti-worker, anti-union legislature in West Virginia.

Don’t know where to vote? You can look up your registration status and find your polling location by visiting  the WV Secretary of State website at this link: https://services.sos.wv.gov/Elections/Voter/FindMyPollingPlace

 

Candidates Endorsed by UFCW Local 400:

PARKERSBURG AREA

3rd SENATORIAL DISTRICT:
JAMES LEACH (D)

7TH  HOUSE DISTRICT:
LISSA LUCAS (D)

8TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
DAVID BLAND   (D)

9TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
JIM MARION (D)

10TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
ANDY DANIEL (D)
J.MORGAN LEACH (D)
HARRY DEITZLER (D)

12TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
MISSY MORRIS (D)

13TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
SCOTT BREWER (D)

14TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
BRIANNE SOLOMON (D)

 

BECKLEY AREA

6TH SENATORIAL DISTRICT:
CHARLES SAMMONS (D) 

10TH SENATORIAL DISTRICT:
STEPHEN BALDWIN (D)

26TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
ED EVANS (D)

27TH  HOUSE DISTRICT:
PHOEBE MEADOWS (D) 

28TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
JOSEPH ANDREW EVANS (D)
ANDRA LEE SHAW (D)

29TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
RICK MOYE (D)

30TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
MICK BATES (D) 

31ST HOUSE DISTRICT:
RICHARD SNUFFER (D)

32ND HOUSE DISTRICT:
MARGARET ANNE STAGGERS (D)
SELINA VICKERS (D)
LUKE LIVELY (D)

 

CLARKSBURG-MORGANTOWN-BUCKHANNON AREA

2ND SENATORIAL DISTRICT:
DENNY LONGWELL (D)

11TH SENATORIAL DISTRICT:
BILL HAMILTON (R)

12TH SENATORIAL DISTRICT:
MIKE ROMANO (D)

13TH SENATORIAL DISTRICT:
BOB BEACH   (D)

14TH SENATORIAL DISTRICT:
STEPHANIE ZUCKER (D)

5TH HOUSE  DISTRICT:
DAVE PETHTEL (D) 

6TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
T. CHRIS COMBS (D)

46TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
ROBERT STULTZ (D)

47TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
FRANK ED LARRY (D)

48TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
TIM MILEY (D)
RICHARD IAQUINTA (D)
ROBERT GARCIA (D)
DEREK MCINTYRE (D)

51ST HOUSE DISTRICT:
BARBARA FLEISCHAUER (D)
EVAN HANSON (D)
JOHN WILLIAMS (D)
DANIELLE WALKER (D)
RODNEY PYLES (D)

52ND HOUSE DISTRICT:
JUSTIN HOUGH(R)

53RD HOUSE DISTRICT:
CORY CHASE (D)

 

HUNTINGTON AREA

5TH SENATORIAL DISTRICT:
MIKE WOELFEL (D) 

6TH SENATORIAL DISTRICT:
CHARLES SAMMONS (D)    

7TH SENATORIAL DISTRICT:
RON STOLLINGS (D)

16TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
SEAN HORNBUCKLE (D)
MATT SPURLOCK (D)
VERA MILLER (R)

17TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
CHAD LOVEJOY(R)
MATTHEW ROHRBACH( D)

19TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
KEN HICKS (D)
ROBERT THOMPSON (D)

20TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
BARRY MARCUM (D)

21ST HOUSE DISTRICT:
PHYLIS WHITE (D)

22ND HOUSE DISTRICT:
GARY MCCALLISTER (D)
ZACK MAYNARD (R)

24TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
RALPH RODIGHIERO (D)
SUSAN PERRY (D)

 

CHARLESTON AREA

4TH SENATORIAL DISTRICT:
BRIAN PRIM (D)

8TH SENATORIAL DISTRICT:
MARK HUNT (D)

17TH SENATORIAL DISTRICT:
TERRELL ELLIS (D)

15TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
CASEY HORTON (D)

23RD HOUSE DISTRICT:
RODNEY MILLER (D)

33RD HOUSE DISTRICT:
DAVID A WALKER (D)

34TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
BRENT BOGG (D)

35TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
ANDREW BYRD (D)
RENATE PORE (D)
JAMES ROBINETTE (D)
DOUG SKAFF JR (D)

36TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
LARRY ROWE (D)
ANDREW ROBINSON (D)
AMANDA ESTEP-BURTON (D)

37TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
MIKE PUSHKINS (D)

38TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
TOM TULL (D)

39TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
DAVID “WOODY” HOLMES (D)

40TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
MELISSA HUFFMAN (D)

Outspoken Kroger Shop Steward Stands Up for Her Coworkers

Courtney Meadows speaks to WVVA news during a #BetterKroger rally in October 2017.

Courtney Meadows speaks her mind—and for the past year, she’s been doing it to great effect.

A Local 400 member for the past seven years who works as lead file maintenance clerk at Kroger #805 in Beckley, W.Va., Courtney was asked to serve on the Contract Action Team during last year’s bargaining over a new contract. Her shop steward at the time said, “There’s your spitfire,” and that was an understatement.

“I won’t hesitate to tell a manager to stop being a jerk and start treating us with respect,” Courtney said. And she was just as outspoken when she went into other Kroger stores to inform and mobilize her sisters and brothers for the contract battle.

“I would ask folks to show up at our rallies and tell management that we’re not going to take any crappy offers,” she said. “We’ve got to get management’s attention.”

At the first rally, between 30 and 40 members attended. But by the last one, Courtney had tripled turnout to 90.

“I just tried to make sure we showed Kroger we’re better people and that we’re not going to stoop to their level of pettiness,” she said. “We kept everything peaceful and respectful, and we had the impact we needed.”

When members voted to ratify the new collective bargaining agreement with Kroger in West Virginia, Courtney was both relieved and proud. “I was very glad of what we accomplished,” she explained. “Like Mark [Federici] said, there’s never been and never will be a perfect contract. But for us to get the only Kroger contract not to lose any benefits and to get wage increases, that was huge. We stuck together, we fought together and we got what we needed.”

In the midst of the contract battle, Courtney became a shop steward at her store. “My rep told me, ‘you’ve earned your stripes,’” she said. In addition, Courtney was asked to join a member organizing drive at Kroger stores in the Richmond/Tidewater area, which took place over 12 days in December.

“This was the hardest thing I’ve ever had to do,” Courtney said. “To come from an area with 100 percent membership and go into stores that had less than 50 percent because of Virginia’s ‘right to work’ law was an eye-opener. Some people didn’t know what a union was and others were scared. So I gave a crash course in union history, and I explained that Kroger can’t do a single thing to you for signing up—it’s your legal right.

“I also talked to them about our own bargaining experience in West Virginia,” she continued. “I went through how we got raises across the board, how we kept our health care the same and how even if the cost of the plan rises, Kroger will pay the difference. We even won the requirement that Kroger has to provide rubber boots for workers in the meat shop. And I explained the reason why we won these provisions is because we have 100 percent membership, and that’s how you can make the same gains here. That really grabbed their attention.

“So I think it was a huge accomplishment to get the applications we were able to get,” she said. “And I’d go back and do it again in a heartbeat.”

In January, Courtney traveled to Charleston to participate in Local 400’s and the West Virginia AFL-CIO’s Lobby Day.

A resident of Fairdale, W.Va., Courtney is looking forward to continuing to take on corporate greed through Local 400. “I’m tired of companies coming in and abusing their employees, and looking down on us because some of us don’t have a college education,” she said. “I’m tired of them making $2 billion in profits but only wanting to pay us just above minimum wage. I’m tired of [Kroger CEO] Rodney McMullen getting a $2 million dollar raise but only wanting to give us 25 cents an hour. And I want to see better working conditions, and no retaliation against people who file grievances.”

Courtney is equally focused on her job as a shop steward. “I talk to everyone and I tell them, ‘you cannot get in trouble for talking to me, they cannot say anything to you,’” she said. “Everything they say to me is confidential. And if they have a problem, I’m going to fight like hell to fix it.”

Her sisters and brothers at Kroger #805—and all Local 400 members—are fortunate to have this spitfire speaking her mind and fighting for them.

Congratulations to ABC Drawing Winner, Chelsea Thompson

Local 400 member Chelsea Thompson from Kroger #316 in Princeton, West Virginia is the most recent winner of our Active Ballot Club drawing! Congratulations, Chelsea!

All across the country, corporations and the ultra-wealthy are funneling unprecedented amounts of money into our political system. Their goal is to create an unbalanced and unfair economy where wages are as low as possible and profits replace respect for the workers that created them.

The UFCW Active Ballot Club (ABC) seeks to level the playing field. By bringing together thousands of workers, our political concerns can be amplified to a decibel that is impossible to ignore. ABC supports pro-worker candidates and incumbents from all political parties and is the prominent political action committee dedicated to the interests of UFCW members nationwide.

By joining ABC, active members are automatically entered to win a monthly drawing. Learn more about the UFCW Active Ballot Club and talk to your rep about signing up today!

Kroger Associates Win Thousands of Dollars in Back Pay by Enforcing Union Contract

Ryan Kibble (right), a meatcutter at Kroger in Ripley, W.Va., was awarded $2,000 in back pay after the company was caught violating the seniority provisions of his union contract.

For Ryan Kibble, Chasity Moyers and more than a dozen other Kroger members in West Virginia and Ohio, justice has prevailed.

More than one year ago, they were denied promotions that rightfully should have been theirs due to the seniority provisions in their union contract.

“Seniority provisions are one of the most important protections in our union contracts,” explained Local 400 President Mark Federici. “By prioritizing the most senior employees for promotions and other benefits, seniority gives every worker the confidence of knowing that if you stick it out and pay your dues, then you will get ahead. It puts everyone on an even playing field and prevents managers from playing favorites and only promoting people they like.

“But, just like everything else in our contracts, the rules only protect us when we enforce them,” Federici added. “Ryan and Chasity did just that – and it paid off.”

Ryan Kibble was a full-time backup meat cutter at Kroger #708 in Ripley W.Va. In late 2016, he signed up for a backup customer service position at Kroger #799 in Belpre, Ohio, a move that would have cut his commute from his Parkersburg, W.Va. home from 45 minutes to just five minutes. However, the job was given to a part-time worker in violation of the contract. So Ryan filed a grievance.

“Kroger tried to pick and choose who they want,” Ryan said. “They claimed I had no skill for the position, but I had that job at a previous employer.”

After a lengthy back and forth, Ryan won his grievance in December and received $2,000 in back pay. While this victory gave him the right to take the backup customer service position, he had become a meat cutter at Kroger #799 in the midst of the grievance process and chose to stay in his current job.

“I was glad it was finally over,” he said. “And I was glad that Kroger finally had to pay for their mistake, which they need to do. You can’t set rules and then try to bend and break them whenever you want.”

Chasity Moyers had a similar experience. She was a full-time bakery clerk at Kroger #799 and signed up for a backup dairy position that opened up at her store. Someone else was given the job, and she soon realized she had more seniority than this person, so she also filed a grievance.

While her grievance was pending, the backup drug GM position came open at Kroger #799. “I signed up for that, too,” she said. “And I didn’t get that one either. So I had to file another grievance.”

A few months later, the backup drug GM position came open again and this time, she got it. But before she moved into that job, the head drug GM transferred and so Chasity leapfrogged to head drug GM.

Then, in December, she won her grievance and received nearly $1,200 in back pay.

“I was excited to win and receive the check,” she said. “To be honest, I had kind of forgotten about it because I was now in the job I wanted. But I’m really glad we enforced the contract.  Everybody has their own fair share in this company. This is a fair way to get a resolution out of something that didn’t work out, and I thank everybody who was involved.”

The Kroger West Virginia contract states that the company can award lead or department head jobs to individuals based on their fitness and ability, but when multiple candidates have similar qualifications, the person with the most seniority will receive the promotion. But in many cases, these guidelines were flouted, and the problem was not isolated to one store or one manager—it existed throughout the region. While most grievances have been resolved, some are still in process.

“Just as important as bargaining a contract is the need to enforce it,” said Local 400 President Mark P. Federici. “It’s very important not only for our representatives and shop stewards but for every member to know the contract’s terms and be vigilant about making sure they are followed. It’s our members’ activism that won justice in these cases—and sent a message to Kroger that we will hold the company accountable.”

Local 400 Members Ratify New Contract With Zero Cuts

A team of Kroger store associates led negotiations for the new contract on behalf of UFCW Local 400.

New Contract Increases Pay While Maintaining Healthcare & Retirement Benefits

Today, Local 400 members voted overwhelmingly to ratify a new union contract at Kroger.

This contract has absolutely no cuts. We all know it is extremely rare in this day and age to win a contract without losing a single benefit. Even at a time when other retailers are slashing benefits, we didn’t give up a single thing. We successfully preserved our healthcare and retirement benefits while also increasing pay. And it couldn’t have happened without you.

Thank you to every one of you who took the time to join us at a rally, sign a petition, and take action for a fair contract. We cannot overstate how important your participation has been to our efforts. Thanks to all of us sticking together as a union, we successfully fought back against every cut the company proposed.

The new contract takes effect immediately and extends through August 29, 2020. Let’s continue to stand together, let’s continue to build our union, and let’s keep up the fight every day to get what we deserve.

In Solidarity,

The 2017 Kroger West Virginia Bargaining Committee: Wayne, Billy, Tami, Allen, & Victoria

 

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