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Most Candidates Backed by Local 400 Win Maryland Primary Elections

Photo via Twitter @BenJealous

Jealous Receives Nomination for Governor

Elrich Narrowly Leads Montgomery Executive Race

Candidates backed by Local 400 won more than they lost in the 2018 Maryland primaries, with a huge victory in the nomination of former NAACP President Ben Jealous for governor. Jealous (D) will face off against incumbent Gov. Larry Hogan (R) in the November 6th general election.

In addition, Montgomery County Councilmember Marc Elrich, a longtime Local 400 ally and champion of the $15 minimum wage, is holding a narrow lead of 473 votes in the race for Montgomery County executive as of Wednesday afternoon. This contest won’t be decided for days if not weeks due to the need to count absentee and provisional ballots.

Other winning candidates recommended by Local 400 include:

  • Attorney and community activist Will Jawando, who won the Democratic nomination for a Montgomery County Council at-large seat.
  • Montgomery County Councilmember Nancy Navarro (District 4).
  • Montgomery County Councilmember Tom Hucker (District 5).
  • Civic activist Tom Dernoga, who won the Democratic nomination for Prince George’s County Council in the 1st district.
  • Prince George’s County Councilmember Deni Taveras (District 2).
  • Former State Del. Jolene Ivey, who won the Democratic nomination for Prince George’s County Council in the 5th district.
  • State Del. Aisha Braveboy, who won the Democratic nomination for Prince George’s County State’s Attorney.

In addition, community activist Krystal Oriadha was trailing by just nine votes as of Wednesday afternoon in her race for Prince George’s County Council in the 7th district.

“Local 400 members worked hard for our recommended candidates in this all-important primary election, and I am especially pleased that we have a dynamic Democratic nominee for governor in Ben Jealous,” said Local 400 President Mark P. Federici. “He will be the fiercest fighter for working families we’ve ever had in Annapolis if we can help propel him to victory over Larry Hogan in November. His work as a civil rights leader and community organizer is beyond compare, and his agenda of a $15/hour minimum wage and a free community college education for all is exactly what Marylanders need. We’re going to do everything in our power to elect this great pro-worker champion as Maryland’s next governor.

“While it will take some time to be certain, we are also very pleased that Marc Elrich is leading in the race for Montgomery County Executive,” Federici said. “His sponsorship of Montgomery County’s $15/hour minimum wage law and the consistent strong support he gives to our hardworking members will make him a great progressive leader of this large, diverse county.”

Local 400 recommended candidates who were not nominated include Brandy Brooks and Chris Wilhelm (Montgomery County Council at large), Ben Shnider (Montgomery County Council-3), Donna Edwards (Prince George’s County Executive), Gerron Levi and Karen Toles (Prince George’s County Council at large), and Tony Knotts (Prince George’s County Council 8th district).

“My congratulations to all our recommended candidates, no matter the outcome of their primaries, for running strong campaigns and advocating pro-worker policies,” Federici said. “Now, it’s on to the November general election, where our members will have so much at stake and so much to fight for.”

Maryland Elections: Local 400 Recommends These Candidates

Tuesday, June 26 is election day in Maryland. Make a plan to vote!

As your union, we have endorsed the following list of candidates because of their track record of fighting for economic and social justice. They have committed to passing a $15 minimum wage and supporting efforts to improve the quality of life for our members and all Marylanders. We strongly recommend you give them your vote on Tuesday, June 26th.

Candidates Recommended By UFCW Local 400

Governor & Lieutenant Governor
Ben Jealous & Susan Turnbull

Montgomery County

Montgomery County Executive
Marc Elrich

County Council, At-Large
Brandy Brooks

County Council, At-Large
Will Jawando

County Council, At-Large
Chris Wilhelm

County Council, District 3
Ben Shnider

County Council, District 4
Nancy Navarro

County Council, District 5
Tom Hucker

Prince George’s County

Prince George’s County Executive
Donna Edwards

County Council At Large
Gerron Levi

County Council At Large
Karen Toles

County Council, District 1
Tom Dernoga

County Council, District 2
Taveras Deni

County Council, District 5
Jolene Ivey

County Council, District 7
Krystal Oriadha

County Council, District 8
Tony Knotts

State’s Attorney
Aisha Braveboy

May 8: Cast Your Vote in West Virginia Primary Election

On Tuesday, May 8, 2018, West Virginians will vote in an important statewide primary election. We must vote to change our current legislative leadership’s war on working families which has stifled workers’ voices, lowered wages, and made workplaces less safe.

It is vital that you vote in the election Tuesday, May 8, 2018. Your vote is a personal decision. As your union, it is our job to recommend candidates who share our values and will fight to make a better life for our union family. We have endorsed the following candidates for office because we believe they will fight to turn around the anti-worker, anti-union legislature in West Virginia.

Don’t know where to vote? You can look up your registration status and find your polling location by visiting  the WV Secretary of State website at this link: https://services.sos.wv.gov/Elections/Voter/FindMyPollingPlace

 

Candidates Endorsed by UFCW Local 400:

PARKERSBURG AREA

3rd SENATORIAL DISTRICT:
JAMES LEACH (D)

7TH  HOUSE DISTRICT:
LISSA LUCAS (D)

8TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
DAVID BLAND   (D)

9TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
JIM MARION (D)

10TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
ANDY DANIEL (D)
J.MORGAN LEACH (D)
HARRY DEITZLER (D)

12TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
MISSY MORRIS (D)

13TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
SCOTT BREWER (D)

14TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
BRIANNE SOLOMON (D)

 

BECKLEY AREA

6TH SENATORIAL DISTRICT:
CHARLES SAMMONS (D) 

10TH SENATORIAL DISTRICT:
STEPHEN BALDWIN (D)

26TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
ED EVANS (D)

27TH  HOUSE DISTRICT:
PHOEBE MEADOWS (D) 

28TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
JOSEPH ANDREW EVANS (D)
ANDRA LEE SHAW (D)

29TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
RICK MOYE (D)

30TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
MICK BATES (D) 

31ST HOUSE DISTRICT:
RICHARD SNUFFER (D)

32ND HOUSE DISTRICT:
MARGARET ANNE STAGGERS (D)
SELINA VICKERS (D)
LUKE LIVELY (D)

 

CLARKSBURG-MORGANTOWN-BUCKHANNON AREA

2ND SENATORIAL DISTRICT:
DENNY LONGWELL (D)

11TH SENATORIAL DISTRICT:
BILL HAMILTON (R)

12TH SENATORIAL DISTRICT:
MIKE ROMANO (D)

13TH SENATORIAL DISTRICT:
BOB BEACH   (D)

14TH SENATORIAL DISTRICT:
STEPHANIE ZUCKER (D)

5TH HOUSE  DISTRICT:
DAVE PETHTEL (D) 

6TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
T. CHRIS COMBS (D)

46TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
ROBERT STULTZ (D)

47TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
FRANK ED LARRY (D)

48TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
TIM MILEY (D)
RICHARD IAQUINTA (D)
ROBERT GARCIA (D)
DEREK MCINTYRE (D)

51ST HOUSE DISTRICT:
BARBARA FLEISCHAUER (D)
EVAN HANSON (D)
JOHN WILLIAMS (D)
DANIELLE WALKER (D)
RODNEY PYLES (D)

52ND HOUSE DISTRICT:
JUSTIN HOUGH(R)

53RD HOUSE DISTRICT:
CORY CHASE (D)

 

HUNTINGTON AREA

5TH SENATORIAL DISTRICT:
MIKE WOELFEL (D) 

6TH SENATORIAL DISTRICT:
CHARLES SAMMONS (D)    

7TH SENATORIAL DISTRICT:
RON STOLLINGS (D)

16TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
SEAN HORNBUCKLE (D)
MATT SPURLOCK (D)
VERA MILLER (R)

17TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
CHAD LOVEJOY(R)
MATTHEW ROHRBACH( D)

19TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
KEN HICKS (D)
ROBERT THOMPSON (D)

20TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
BARRY MARCUM (D)

21ST HOUSE DISTRICT:
PHYLIS WHITE (D)

22ND HOUSE DISTRICT:
GARY MCCALLISTER (D)
ZACK MAYNARD (R)

24TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
RALPH RODIGHIERO (D)
SUSAN PERRY (D)

 

CHARLESTON AREA

4TH SENATORIAL DISTRICT:
BRIAN PRIM (D)

8TH SENATORIAL DISTRICT:
MARK HUNT (D)

17TH SENATORIAL DISTRICT:
TERRELL ELLIS (D)

15TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
CASEY HORTON (D)

23RD HOUSE DISTRICT:
RODNEY MILLER (D)

33RD HOUSE DISTRICT:
DAVID A WALKER (D)

34TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
BRENT BOGG (D)

35TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
ANDREW BYRD (D)
RENATE PORE (D)
JAMES ROBINETTE (D)
DOUG SKAFF JR (D)

36TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
LARRY ROWE (D)
ANDREW ROBINSON (D)
AMANDA ESTEP-BURTON (D)

37TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
MIKE PUSHKINS (D)

38TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
TOM TULL (D)

39TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
DAVID “WOODY” HOLMES (D)

40TH HOUSE DISTRICT:
MELISSA HUFFMAN (D)

Felicia Fights to Win Elections, Pass Pro-Worker Laws

Felicia Miller (center) pauses for a photograph with candidate Ralph Northam (left), now governor of Virginia.

Felicia Miller has seen first-hand the power of Local 400 members to improve their lives by getting involved in political and legislative action.

A longtime shop steward who works as a deli clerk at Safeway #1801 in Warrenton, Va., Felicia is a political dynamo who works tirelessly to elect pro-worker candidates and to pressure elected officials to pass pro-worker policies in Richmond and Washington, D.C.

“As union members, we need a voice because it seems like we are being targeted and not in a good way,” Felicia said. “ So I feel we need to get out there and make a difference.”

Last year, Felicia served as co-chair of the Central Virginia Labor Federation’s political action operation, leading the successful fight to elect Ralph Northam, Justin Fairfax and Mark Herring as governor, lieutenant governor and attorney general, respectively.  She also volunteered in the Northern Virginia Labor Federation’s outreach efforts. And she worked to elect Schuyler VanValkenburg and Debra Rodman to the House of Delegates.

“We went into plants like Tyson and Kroger stores to inform and activate members in the campaign,” Felicia said. “I’d ask them, ‘Don’t you want our union to be stronger so we’ll be more effective in getting things done like keeping our health care, getting higher wages, and improving job safety?’

“With all our volunteers, we went door-to-door, did phone banking, and held political events,” she explained. “We had a great turnout, and the results of the election were phenomenal. Everyone on our slate got elected.”

With the new governor and the now-closely divided General Assembly, Felicia has been centrally involved in Local 400’s and the Virginia AFL-CIO’s lobbying efforts, participating in the January 24th Take Action Virginia rally and the January 29th Labor Lobby Day.

“We’ve been fighting for a bill to crack down on wage theft, so employees are paid for all hours worked,” Felicia said. “We want to see a higher minimum wage, but the bill was killed in committee, so it will need to be introduced again. We’re pushing for a menhaden bill, so Local 400 members working at Omega Protein can keep fishing and keep their jobs. Medicaid expansion is also a priority, as is making sure teachers are getting paid fairly.”

In late January, Felicia went to the U.S. Capitol to lobby her senators, Mark Warner and Tim Kaine. “We mainly talked about protecting immigrants’ rights and keeping DACA, so dreamers can stay in the country they grew up in, as well as transgender rights,” she said.

In her work as a shop steward, Felicia said, “My focus is watching to make sure everybody is getting the right amount of hours and that managers uphold the contract’s seniority requirements. We’ve had to be vigilant about this. We’re also making sure they get the schedule posted on time, which is not always done, so part-timers can plan their lives.

“I also take every opportunity I can to talk to my newly hired colleagues about why they should join Local 400,” she said. “I talk with younger people about the benefits and the entertainment discounts, while I talk with older people about health care and our pension. And I remind everybody about all the great community work our union does, from LGBTQ outreach to the charities we’re involved with, as well as our annual picnics.”

Looking to the future, Felicia is aiming high. “I would love to get rid of the ‘right to work’ law,” she said. “I know that will be hard because it’s been in place for so long, but we did stop it from becoming part of the Virginia Constitution. It’s not right that people can benefit from our union without paying their fair share.”

Felicia lives in Spotsylvania County with her wife and has two adult daughters. With 33 years as a Local 400 member, she is grateful for what her union has done for her. “It has been an awesome ride because I have had the protection of health care, decent wages, and the opportunities to get out and speak with our members and do legislative work to make our union stronger,” she said.

Local 400 Endorses Donna Edwards for Prince George’s County Executive

Local 400 joins three other local labor unions to endorse former Congresswoman

Today, a coalition of four labor unions jointly announced their endorsement of former Congresswoman Donna Edwards for Prince George’s County Executive, including UFCW Local 400, UNITE HERE Local 25, LIUNA Mid-Atlantic, and UFCW Local 1994 MCGEO. Together, the organizations represent more than 10,000 workers in the county.

“We are proud to once again lend our support to Donna Edwards,” said UFCW Local 400 President Mark Federici. “Donna stays true to her progressive values, even when the odds are stacked against her. These days, Donna is just the kind of champion we need. In Congress, she consistently fought to bring better opportunities to working families. But beyond fighting for strong policies, Donna understands the importance of bringing every aspect of the community together to get things done. As executive, we know she will bring much-needed opportunities to the hardworking men and women of Prince George’s County.”

“The members of UNITE HERE Local 25 proudly endorse Donna Edwards,” said Linda Martin, President of UNITE HERE Local 25. “As hotel workers, our priority is to ensure that our next County Executive is a true champion of working people, and there is no better champion than Donna. She stood with Local 25 members when we organized at the Gaylord hotel in National Harbor, and her unblemished record of supporting unions and progressive policies is exactly what Prince George’s County needs as we look to the future. Local 25 understands that for Prince George’s County to fulfill its potential, we need a County Executive with a fresh vision who puts people before special interests and developers. Donna is that person.”

“She has remained a champion for working people throughout her career,” said Dennis Martire, Vice President and Regional Manager of LiUNA Mid-Atlantic. “She fights for working families every day, and that is why LiUNA proudly stands with Donna Edwards.”

“Donna Edwards has defended our community as a member of Congress, an organizer and a non-profit leader,” said Gino Renne, President of UFCW Local 1994 MCGEO. “It is because of Donna’s fearless integrity that she will bring our community together to ensure government is transparent and accountable to the people and ensures that our economy benefits Prince George’s working families.”

Maryland Primary Elections: Tuesday, June 26, 2018

The Maryland Primary elections are on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Make a plan to vote on Tuesday, June 26, 2018.

Not registered to vote in Maryland? Click here to register online through the Maryland State Board of Elections website.

How Candidates Are  Recommended

Local 400 recommends candidates for office only after an exhaustive process of getting to know them, analyzing their records, and reviewing their positions on issues impacting our members’ lives. These issues include jobs, the economy, workers’ rights, health care, retirement security, workers’ compensation and education. We recommend those candidates judged to have your best interests in mind.

In order to decide on a candidate to endorse, we:

  1. Review the voting records of incumbents on labor issues.
  2. Participate in the AFL-CIO interview process and schedule one-on-one interviews between Local 400 and many of the candidates.
  3. Discuss with other union members and leaders the interviews and the written questionnaires candidates submit.
  4. Make recommendations to the executive boards of the relevant area labor councils.
  5. Participate in state AFL-CIO meetings, where delegates from Local 400 and other unions vote to give labor’s recommendation to a limited number of candidates.
  6. After acceptance, these recommendations are communicated to Local 400 members.

Huge Issues at Stake In Virginia Elections – Vote November 7th!

Local 400 members in Virginia—and all the commonwealth’s working families—have much at stake in the Tuesday, November 7th elections for governor, lieutenant governor, attorney general and the House of Delegates.

The Local 400-led Fight for $15 in Richmond has been blocked until now by anti-worker members of the General Assembly, but if opponents of the $15/hour minimum wage are defeated and control of the House shifts to pro-worker forces, victory will be within reach.

Another vitally important issue is whether Medicaid will be expanded—just as Maryland, the District of Columbia and West Virginia have done—to cover 400,000 uninsured Virginians living between 100 percent and 138 percent of the poverty level.

In all the key races, the choices could not be more clear. Local 400 recommends Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam for governor, Justin Fairfax for lieutenant governor, and Attorney General Mark Herring for re-election in the statewide contests.

“Ralph Northam will be on our side as governor, just as he has been throughout his career as a state senator and lieutenant governor,” said Local 400 President Mark P. Federici. “He’ll fight for higher wages and better jobs, expand Medicaid, and look out for the interest of working families. By contrast, his opponent is a longtime lobbyist who’s made millions representing corporate, anti-worker interests—and who would continue to do their bidding in Richmond.”

Northam is a veteran Army doctor, pediatric neurologist, and volunteer medical director for a pediatric hospice care facility who moved into public service a decade ago with a focus on improving Virginian’s health and economy. His opponent, Ed Gillespie, has represented companies like the corrupt Enron and Bank of America, which sold defective mortgages that contributed to the 2008 financial crisis.

In addition to wages and health, another key issue in this campaign is redistricting. Today, Virginia is carved into congressional and state legislative districts that minimize the votes of workers and people of color, and rig the outcome in favor of anti-worker forces. If pro-worker forces can keep the governorship and take control of the General Assembly, Virginia can have fair representation again, one that reflects the true will of the commonwealth’s voters.

“I urge our members to volunteer in our efforts to go door to door and operate phone banks, as we spread the word about how much this election matters to Virginia’s working families,” Federici said. “And above all, please vote on November 7th.”

VOTE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7TH!

Recommended Candidates

Governor

Ralph Northam

Lieutenant Governor

Justin Fairfax

Attorney General

Mark Herring

Virginia House of Delegates

2nd–Jennifer Foy

12th–Chris Hurst

13th–Danica Roem

21st–Kelly Fowler

31st–Elizabeth Guzman

32nd–David Reid

34th–Kathleen Murphy

42nd–Kathy Tran

50th–Lee Carter

51st–Hala Ayala

67th–Karrie Delaney

87th–John Bell

93rd–Mike Mullin

94th–Shelly Simonds

100th–Willie Randall

How Candidates Are  Recommended

Local 400 recommends candidates for office only after an exhaustive process of getting to know them, analyzing their records, and reviewing their positions on issues impacting our members’ lives. These issues include jobs, the economy, workers’ rights, health care, retirement security, workers’ compensation and education. We recommend those candidates judged to have your best interests in mind.

In Virginia, we:

  1. Review the voting records of incumbents on labor issues.
  2. Participate in the AFL-CIO interview process and schedule one-on-one interviews between Local 400 and many of the candidates.
  3. Discuss with other union members and leaders the interviews and the written questionnaires candidates submit.
  4. Make recommendations to the executive boards of the relevant area labor councils.
  5. Participate in state AFL-CIO meetings, where delegates from Local 400 and other unions vote to give labor’s recommendation to a limited number of candidates.
  6. After acceptance, these recommendations are communicated to Local 400 members.

Please note that for offices not listed above, Local 400 has made no recommendation.

Polls will be open from 6:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. If you cannot cast your ballot on election day, please apply for an absentee ballot no later than 5:00 p.m., October 31st by visiting the Virginia Department of Elections website.

Labor, Community Groups Host Meet & Greet with Former Congresswoman Donna Edwards

On Wednesday morning, former Congresswoman Donna Edwards shared reflections on our country’s current political atmosphere and her vision of the future of her community with a crowd of labor leaders, local politicians and interested residents of Prince George’s County. The event was hosted by UFCW Local 400, along with UNITE HERE Local 25, CASA in Action and LiUNA Mid-Atlantic, representatives of which enthusiastically introduced Edwards as an advocate and friend of working families.

Edwards, a former congresswoman from Maryland’s fourth district, lost a closely-watched Senate race last April in which she was endorsed by Local 400. As she explained to the crowded room, after leaving office, she seized the opportunity to go on a three-month road trip across the country. Edwards said this time away from home gave her space to reflect on her pride in her community and her ability to serve it. She returned from her trip more aware of the “promise and opportunity” of her county, and resolved to capitalize on this potential.

In her search for local solutions, Edwards recalled the community activism she was involved in beginning in 1999, when plans for a development project in Fort Washington included turning a two-lane road into a four-lane road. The road bordered Fort Foote Elementary School, and Edwards and other members of her community were determined to keep it a safe and welcoming place for children and their families. They saw the fruits of their activism in the completion of this re-developed road two years ago – still two lanes, but with added sidewalks, roundabouts, and bike trails.

“Progress is slow,” Edwards said, but for her this was a clear reminder of what can happen “when you organize in your community and fight for what you want in your community and don’t let up.”

She reiterated this message of collective community activism throughout a discussion in which constituents expressed concerns about education, immigration, health care, prison reform, and protecting the environment. She emphasized the fact that county governments have more flexibility than many realize in how they use taxpayer dollars, regardless of the policies of the federal government. “It’s tough for a county to push back against the federal government, but it’s the right thing to do,” she said. “Four years is a long time, but four years is a short time.”

She envisions refocusing county resources toward protecting and supporting the county’s large immigrant population, helping residents get the health care they need, and improving the area’s lowest performing schools. “Education doesn’t work trickle down, it works bottom up – just like, actually, a lot of things,” she said.

Indeed this seems to be Edwards’ strategy for enacting change in general: start at the bottom, with local issues like trash collection. Edwards recalled encountering a woman at the pharmacy who recognized her as an elected official and began complaining about her infrequent trash pick-up. “Little things can start to get on your nerves because they start to mirror some of the bigger problems,” Edwards said. “Structural problems become even more difficult to solve if people don’t trust you to pick up their trash.”

Edwards closed by addressing rumors that she is gearing up for another political campaign. “I haven’t decided if I’m going to run for anything,” she said. “What I have decided is that there are so many different ways that we can contribute to and strengthen our communities.”

While Edwards was sure to make clear that she has not made any decisions about whether she will run for political office in upcoming county or state elections, there is no doubt that she intends to remain a leader in determining the future of the county. For now she intends to think about how she can best serve, whether as an elected official, in the non-profit sector or somewhere else. “When I figure that out, y’all will know,” she said.

Four Candidates Recommended by Local 400 Win Elections in Virginia

The results are in from yesterday’s closely-watched primary election in Virginia. Local 400 recommended candidates for the Virginia House of Delegates in six districts. Four of the candidates won their races:

In House District 31, Elizabeth Guzman won the Democratic primary with 52.16% of the vote. In District 51, Hala Ayala won with 66.34% of the vote. Karrie Delaney won in House District 67 with 65.33% of the vote. And in District 92, Jeion Joyner Ward won with an overwhelming 87.54% of the vote.

In District 42, Tilly Blanding lost to Kathy K. L. Tran. Meanwhile, Josh King was defeated by Jennifer Carroll Foy in District 2 by a mere ten votes.

Local 400 made some of these recommendations in conjunction with Take Action Virginia, a partnership of major community and labor groups representing tens of thousands of the commonwealth’s workers fighting for policies to raise the standard of living and protect people’s rights.

For a complete list of election results, visit the Virginia Department of Elections website.

Local 400 Recommends Candidates in June 13th Virginia Primary

With key issues at stake affecting Virginia members, including a $15 minimum wage, immigrant protections, and the right to union representation, Local 400 has recommended six candidates for the state House of Delegates in the June 13th primary election.

The candidates Local 400 has identified as strongly pro-worker include:

House District 2: Josh King

House District 31: Elizabeth Guzman

House District 42: Tilly Blanding

House District 51: Hala Ayala

House District 67: Karrie Delaney

House District 92: Jeion Joyner Ward

“The Commonwealth of Virginia desperately needs the progressive leadership these candidates will provide,” said Local 400 President Mark P. Federici. “In the retail industry in particular, too many Virginia families are struggling to make ends meet even though their employers are as profitable as ever. We need leaders in Richmond who are willing to act to provide opportunities for hardworking men and women to earn a better life.

“The election of good people like our recommended candidates can help shift the balance in the General Assembly and could make possible the passage of laws that will make a profound, positive difference in people’s lives, like a $15 minimum wage,” Federici said.

Local 400 made some of these recommendations in conjunction with Take Action Virginia, a partnership of major community and labor groups representing tens of thousands of the commonwealth’s workers fighting for policies to raise the standard of living and protect people’s rights.

We encourage all members to volunteer their time in the Local 400/Take Action Virginia campaign to elect these recommended candidates. And we urge all of our members in Virginia to vote in the June 13th primary. Polls are open from 6:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.

If you can’t make it to the polls on election day, you can request an absentee ballot on the Virginia Department of Elections website. The deadline for requesting an absentee ballot by mail is Tuesday, June 6th. The deadline for requesting an absentee ballot by appearing in-person is June 10th.