Tagged as #KrogerStrong

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In Case You Missed It: Minimum Wage is on the Up & Up!

MinimumWage_ALLIn case you missed it January 1, 2015 the minimum wage increased in 21 states, including Maryland and West Virginia. (D.C.’s wage increased July 1) Be sure to check and double-check your pay checks.

 

And those that are included in the West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio Kroger bargaining agreement you should all be getting pay increases as well. Click here for more information.

Kroger WV, KY, OH New Negotiated Pay Scale Explained

Here are a few examples we put together to better explain the new pay scales in the 3-year agreement which was ratified November 3, 2014.

Example 1: Part Time
My name is George and I started working for Kroger in November 2014 at $7.25 an hour. By January 1, 2015, due to the minimum wage law I will be making $8.10 an hour. After a total of 7 months with the company or in June 2015, I will be making $8.15 an hour and after 13 months with the company or in December 2015, I will be making $8.20 an hour. Then in January 2016 the minimum wage will take its next hike and will bump me up to $8.75 an hour. I will remain at $8.75 an hour until the next negotiated increase to $8.95 an hour in January 2017. Then after 31 months total with the company or in June 2017, I will be making $9.00 an hour. This is a total of $1.75 increase throughout the life of the 3-year agreement. Visual for this example is below.

Example1

Example 2: Part Time
My name is Cindy and I have 37 months with Kroger and I currently (November 2014) make $7.80 an hour. By January 1, 2015, due to the minimum wage law, I will be making $8.40 an hour.  After a total of 43 months with the company or in May 2015, I will be making $8.45 an hour and after 49 months with the company or in November 2015, I will be making $8.55 an hour. Then on January 1, 2016 the minimum wage will take its next hike and will bump me up to $8.85 an hour. After a total 55 months or in May 2016, I will be making $8.90 an hour. Then in January 2017 I will get another negotiated increase to $9.25 an hour. By May 2017, after being with the company for 67 months, I will be making $9.30 an hour. This is a total of $1.50 increase throughout the life of the 3-year agreement. Visual for this example is below.

Example2

Example 3: Part Time
My name is Gregory and I been working at Kroger for 67 months (5.5 years) and I currently (November 2014) make $8.65 an hour. By January 1, 2015, due to the minimum wage law, I will be making $8.85 an hour. After a total of 73 months with the company or in May 2015, I will be making $8.95 an hour. Then on January 1, 2016 the minimum wage increase will raise my wage to $9.05 an hour. After a total 85 months or in May 2016, I will be making $9.10 an hour. Then in January 2017, I will get another negotiated increase to $9.40 an hour. By May 2017, after being with the company for 97 months, I will be making top rate at $11.40 an hour. This is a total of $2.75 increase throughout the life of the 3-year agreement. Visual for this example is below.

Example3

Example 4: Full Time
My name is Laney, I work full time at Kroger currently making $11.00 an hour after working for the company for 61 months. After a total of 67 months with the company or in May 2015, I will be making $11.25 an hour. Then in February 2015 the top rate of pay increases to $14.01, when I reach 73 months, or November 2015 my rate will reflect this increase. Then boom, two months later I’ll go up to $14.26 an hour and one year later in January 2017 I will get another negotiated increase to $14.51 an hour. This is a total of $3.51 increase throughout the life of the 3-year agreement. Visual for this example is below.

Example4

Kroger Members Ratify Three-Year Collective Bargaining Agreement!

Maintains Health Benefits, Retirement Security, Standard of Living

Kroger WV, KY, OH bargaining committee!

Kroger WV, KY, OH bargaining committee

CHARLESTON, November 3 — Members of United Food & Commercial Workers (UFCW) Local 400 today voted to ratify a new, three-year collective bargaining agreement with Kroger in West Virginia, Ohio, and Kentucky that preserves their health and retirement security and increases their wages.

The bargaining was difficult and lengthy, largely due to complications and additional costs imposed by the Affordable Care Act (ACA), but after a sustained campaign of member activism in stores, Local 400 members were able to earn a strong contract. Notably, this contract increases wages, for everyone on one wage scale based on the new, higher minimum wage in West Virginia. It also keeps weekly health care contributions the same, with no increases over the life of the contract.

“This contract is an improvement,” said Local 400 President Mark P. Federici. “Our members will keep their current health care benefits, with no increase in weekly premiums, and won’t be forced onto the often inferior plans offered through the ACA’s health care exchanges. Kroger will pay their share of benefits in full through the life of the contract, our members’ pensions will be properly funded, and our members will all see pay increases.”
krogerwvgroupseated_small

“It is the activism of our members, and the support they have from their customers and the community, that enabled us to achieve these gains,” Federici said. “Their dedication, strength, and willingness to turn up the heat on Kroger at the store level when it was necessary, is the reason why we have this contract today—a contract that they not only deserve, but rightfully earned.”

During negotiations, the Bargaining Advisory Committee visited all of the Kroger stores in the region represented by Local 400 to call on their fellow members to take action by signing pledge cards that they “demand a fair contract” to turn in to store management, wearing their gold union shop buttons, as well as their camouflage UFCW Local 400 hats while at work.

“We showed Kroger that we are united—every union button, hat, and pledge card signed was another wave of solidarity sent right to the bargaining table giving our union leadership leverage,” said Tami Faulknier, Bargaining Advisory Committee member from Kroger #768 in Dunbar, WV “By us standing together and taking action in our stores we earned the quality contract we have today!”

“From what we started with, when the company proposed changes to our health care that even they called drastic, we’ve come a long way and on top of that we got some extra money in our pockets!,” said Kendall Moore, a Bargaining Committee Member who works at Kroger #754 in Marmet, WV.

“It took us working past the original expiration date, but I’m proud of my coworkers, fellow bargaining committee members, and the leadership of our union, we fought hard and are proud of the agreement we have reached,” said Fred Meredith, a Bargaining Advisory Committee Member from Kroger #799 in Belpre, OH.

“Management wanted to take everything away from us,” said Theresa Haney, a member of the Bargaining Advisory Committee who works at Kroger #796 in Ashland, KY. “But we showed Kroger we are strong, that we were willing to do whatever it took to get a fair deal at the table, and it is great knowing that we earned this contract together, as a membership.”

The collective bargaining agreement takes effect retroactively as of October 15, 2014. It expires on October 7, 2017, and covers 4,000 workers.

WV, KY, OH Kroger Bargaining Update: Bargaining Continues as Store Actions Build

An update from your Bargaining Committee:WVbargainingupdateOct17,2014

“We’re Ready To Fight!

Contract negotiations continued this week. In addition to agreeing to an extension, meaning our current con- tract will remain in effect through October 31 and then on a day-to-day basis unless cancelled by us or Kroger with 72 hours written notice, we continued to exchange proposals relating to our health and welfare fund. Kroger is feeling the heat we are putting on them as we join to- gether in the stores! We appreciate knowing that you have our backs as we fight, together, for a fair contract.

If you need more buttons, cards, or other materials in your store, con- tact your representative and look out for actions this coming week.

 

In the meantime, check out the photos from store visits and pledge card actions on Local 400’s Facebook page! 

WV, KY, OH KROGER BARGAINING UPDATE: CONTRACT EXTENDED

Today we signed an agreement to extend our current contract through
October 31, 2014.
The contract will remain in effect day-to-day after that, but can be cancelled by either us or Kroger with 72 hours written notice.
Everything in our agreement will remain in effect through that day and when we get a new agreement, it will be retroactive to October 15, our original expiration date.
We have been working hard to get the best possible deal, but in order to get what we deserve, and to get it done right, we need more time. As we continue to work at the bargaining table, we need you to continue to have our backs in the stores.
We are going to start preparing people for what we might have to do if we do not have an agreement by this new deadline. Look for actions and meetings in your stores and contact your representative if you have questions or to get involved.

Screen Shot 2014-10-15 at 12.33.07 PM

Kroger West Virginia Contract Bargaining Began This Week

We’re back at the table again with Kroger, but this time in West Virginia!
A message from your bargaining committee:
“We have worked hard to make Kroger a thriving company and it’s time for us to share in that success. We are ready to do whatever it takes to fight for and win the contract we have earned. Be on the lookout for actions to start at stores soon!”

 

MeetYourCommitteeWVa

UFCW Local 400 Members Working at Kroger Ratify Four-Year Collective Bargaining Agreement

Maintains Health Benefits, Retirement Security, Standard of Living

MediumKrogerBargainingCommitteeMembers_VictoryMembers of United Food & Commercial Workers (UFCW) Local 400 today voted overwhelmingly to ratify a new, four-year collective bargaining agreement with Kroger in the Richmond and Tidewater areas that preserves their health and retirement security and increases their wages.

The bargaining was difficult and lengthy, largely due to complications and additional costs imposed by the Affordable Care Act (ACA), but after a sustained campaign of member activism, both on a regional and national level, Local 400 members were able to win a strong contract. Notably, this contract implements raises based on seniority, abolishing the old system that left raises up to the discretion of store managers. It also includes health care “Maintenance of Benefits,” meaning that Kroger will contribute whatever is necessary to the health care fund to pay all benefits.

“This contract is an improvement,” said Local 400 President Mark P. Federici. “Our members will keep their current health care benefits and won’t be forced onto the often inferior plans offered through the ACA’s health care exchanges. Kroger will pay their share of benefits in full through the life of the contract, our members’ pensions will be properly funded, and our members won’t be subjected to management playing ‘favorites’ when it comes to pay increases.

“It is the activism of our members, and the solidarity shown throughout the country, that enabled us to achieve these gains,” Federici said. “Their dedication, strength, and willingness to turn up the heat on Kroger at the store level when it was necessary, is the reason why we have this solid contract today—a contract that they not only deserve, but rightfully earned.”

Locally, Kroger members and their allies in the community leafleted stores, gathering thousands of shoppers’ pledges to stand with them through contract negotiations. They also rallied their coworkers at Kroger stores nationwide to wear buttons reading, “Solidarity with Virginia Kroger Workers”, on their aprons and shirts while at work to not only show management they were standing together in the fight for a fair contract, but also showing support for workers at the new Kroger Marketplace stores in Richmond and Virginia Beach.

The fight for fairness and respect at the Marketplace stores is just beginning. Kroger’s new Marketplace stores, which resemble another giant retailer facing massive worker protests, sell not just groceries but clothing and jewelry. In these new stores, Kroger is not giving employees the opportunity to have a voice at work free form intimidation and coercion. Instead, they are promising higher wages in exchange for a signature on a piece of paper saying they won’t join the union. Local 400 leadership, Kroger members, and community activists hand delivered a letter the Richmond Marketplace store manager in May demanding an end to these anti-worker tactics.

“It was a long challenging ride to reach this good contract we ratified today,” said Peggy Billie, a Bargaining Committee member who works at Kroger #500 in Richmond. “And we aren’t done. We are going to keep the pressure up on Kroger until our fellow workers at the Marketplace stores have the same rights and protections on the job as we do in other stores in the region and across the country.”

“From what we started with, when the company proposed taking away part-time and spousal health care, we’ve come a long way and on top of that we got some extra money in our pockets!,” said Joseph Vaughn, a Bargaining Committee Member who works at Kroger #537 in Virginia Beach. “We have demonstrated that by standing together we are strong!”

“It took us working past the original expiration date, but I’m proud of my coworkers, fellow bargaining committee members, and the leadership of our union, we fought hard and are proud of the agreement we have reached,” said Michael Holcomb, a committee member from Kroger #511 in Richmond.

“Management wanted to take everything away from us,” said Laverne Wrenn, a member of the Bargaining Advisory Committee who works at Kroger #538. “But we showed the company we are strong. We told them we are ready to fight. And that is what made the difference.”

The collective bargaining agreement takes effect retroactively as of August 3, 2014. It expires on August 4, 2018, and covers 3,500 workers. The previous contract was extended three times as negotiators sought to overcome the significant challenges before them.

“This contract will enable Kroger to maintain their dominance as the number one grocery retailer, while doing right by the workers whose productivity and customer service have lifted them to the top,” Federici said. “We look forward to implementing it and helping these chains expand their market share.”